THIS IS HOME: Meet the Syrian Child Refugees Behind the Cameras

PHOTO: Syrian refugees in the Zaatari refugee camp take pictures.PlayAya Al Khatib/UNICEF
WATCH This Is Home: Children Document Life in Largest Syrian Refugee Camp

ABC News teamed up with UNICEF to give digital cameras to over 50 Syrian children ages 11 to 18 living in the Za'atari refugee camp in Jordan. We asked them to spend a week documenting daily life there. Now we are sharing their stories and their photos with you.

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PHOTO: Young Syrian refugees in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan learn to take photographs.
SLIDESHOW: The Children Behind the Photos

To learn a bit more about some of the young people behind the cameras, here are their profiles, translated from Arabic into English, along with a few of their photos.

UNICEF
PHOTO: Ahmad Al-Koud

What is your name? Ahmad Al-Koud.

How old are you? Just turned 18.

Where in Syria did you live? Al-Harra.

How many years have you been in the Za'atari camp? Two and a half.

What do you want to be when you grow up? My dream is to be a schoolteacher and shape the next generation.

PHOTO: A boy about my age transports items on a wheelbarrow past the mosque.Ahmad Al-Koud/UNICEF
A boy about my age transports items on a wheelbarrow past the mosque.

PHOTO: The falafel fryer and the beauty of food with the rays of sunlight shown through the mosque minaret at dusk. It gives me hope for a better life someday.Ahmad Al-Koud/UNICEF
The falafel fryer and the beauty of food with the rays of sunlight shown through the mosque minaret at dusk. It gives me hope for a better life someday.

UNICEF
PHOTO: Aya Barghash

What is your name? Aya Barghash.

How old are you? 16.

Where in Syria did you live? Dara'a.

How many years have you been in the Za'atari camp? Three.

What do you want to be when you grow up? A psychologist, so that I can help people with their problems and worries.

PHOTO: Children from our neighborhood go to a learning center. Aya Barghash/UNICEF
Children from our neighborhood go to a learning center.

PHOTO: My cute little sister Farah helps out with chores in the house.Aya Barghash/UNICEF
My cute little sister Farah helps out with chores in the house.

UNICEF
PHOTO: Bayan Masri

What is your name? Bayan Masri.

How old are you? 17.

Where in Syria did you live? Dara'a.

How many years have you been in the Za'atari camp? Almost four.

How would you describe your life in the camp in one sentence? I don’t want to go back to the war in Syria.

PHOTO: I tried to create this photo like a painting, using the dark part to frame the view outside. I took this looking out from inside my fathers shop.Bayan Masri/UNICEF
I tried to create this photo like a painting, using the dark part to frame the view outside. I took this looking out from inside my father's shop.

PHOTO: This is our neighbors daughter. I helped raise her and love her like my own sister. She is crying because she wanted ice cream.Bayan Masri/UNICEF
This is our neighbor's daughter. I helped raise her and love her like my own sister. She is crying because she wanted ice cream.

UNICEF
PHOTO: Mohammad Nour Al Abdallah

What is your name? Mohammad Nour Al-Abdallah.

How old are you? 16.

Where in Syria did you live? Damascus.

How many years have you been in the Za'atari camp? Almost four.

What do you want to be when you grow up? My dream is to become a building engineer, and what I want even more is to become a soccer player.

PHOTO: Children carry bread home. We go to the WFP center every morning around 7 a.m. to get bread. Mohammad Nour Al Abdallah/UNICEF
Children carry bread home. We go to the WFP center every morning around 7 a.m. to get bread.

PHOTO: Red bell peppers being unloaded at the vegetable shop. There is a lot of demand for red bell peppers and eggplant as we use them to make a tasty pickle called maqdoos. Mohammad Nour Al Abdallah/UNICEF
Red bell peppers being unloaded at the vegetable shop. There is a lot of demand for red bell peppers and eggplant as we use them to make a tasty pickle called maqdoos.

UNICEF
PHOTO: Reem Al-Hariri

What is your name? Reem Al-Hariri.

How old are you? 14.

Where in Syria did you live? Dara'a.

What do you want to be when you grow up? A journalist, because I like to spread news and I think news should be available to anybody.

What is the thing you like most about the Za'atari camp? The security. There is safety here, which is good.

PHOTO: This garden was created by the people in District 1, Street 12. Every family came and planted something, so its a collective effort.Reem Al-Hariri/UNICEF
This garden was created by the people in District 1, Street 12. Every family came and planted something, so it's a collective effort.

PHOTO: A sweet little neighbor of mine.Reem Al-Hariri/UNICEF
A sweet little neighbor of mine.

ABC News’ Phaedra Singelis, Jeesoo Park, Ronnie Polidoro, Rym Momtaz, Kirit Radia, Lena Masri, Qossay Alsattari and Armando García contributed to this report.