Lobna AlHariri/UNICEF
  • It's hard work pushing a cart, but these boys seemed to be enjoying themselves in the pleasant evening.

    ABC News partnered with UNICEF to give kids in Za'atari refugee camp in Jordan cameras to document daily life there. We asked the kids to describe the photos they took. The following are summaries of their captions, translated from Arabic into English.
    Lobna AlHariri/UNICEF
  • A view of the camp in the evening during sunset. I love taking pictures of the setting sun.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • Everyone in the family helps carry water. Here, my young neighbors carry water in buckets.
    Alaa Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • My cute little sister Farah helps out with chores in the house.
    Aya Barghash/UNICEF
  • The falafel fryer and the beauty of food with the rays of sunlight shown through the mosque minaret at dusk. It gives me hope for a better life someday.
    Ahmad Al-Koud/UNICEF
  • Children carry bread home. We go to the World Food Programme center every morning around 7 a.m. to get bread.
    Mohammad Nour Al Abdallah/UNICEF
  • I enjoyed watching and taking pictures of a father teaching his son how to ride a bicycle.
    Mariam Al-Hariri/UNICEF
  • Before: A lunch of chicken, fries, yogurt and salad prepared by my mother.
    Hamza El-Sees/UNICEF
  • After: It was so tasty, we finished the meal in a matter of minutes.
    Hamza El-Sees/UNICEF
  • During a training session for mothers and pregnant women about childcare and health issues, we organized activities for their young children so that the mothers would not be disturbed.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • I like creating things to make the room more beautiful and cozy. I used to do this in Syria, and I wanted to continue here too. It makes me happy that my sisters also love making and decorating things.
    Aya Barghash/UNICEF
  • Children fly kites in an area away from the caravans where no one can disturb them. Many children in the camp make their own kites.
    Mohammad El-Shawamreh/UNICEF
  • I was walking around taking photos when these two boys from the neighborhood begged me to take their picture.
    Khalid Qaffaf/UNICEF
  • I tried to create this photo like a painting, using the dark part to frame the view outside. I took this looking out from inside my father's shop.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • There are 174 types of perfume in my father's shop. Silver Scents (for men) and Blue Lady (for women) are my favorites.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • Red bell peppers are unloaded at the vegetable shop. There is a lot of demand for red bell peppers and eggplant as we use them to make a tasty pickle called maqdoos.
    Mohammad Nour Al Abdallah/UNICEF
  • I took this picture of the dresses in the camp market because it expresses the dreams of all girls.
    Suha Msallam/UNICEF
  • The interiors of our caravans are very dull and boring, so my older brothers draw and paint on the walls, including this beautiful design around the light.
    Khalid Qaffaf/UNICEF
  • A garden in my house. The interesting thing is we didn't plant any of it. It just grew from the seeds we tossed, like peaches and lemons. Now my mother takes care of it.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • This garden was created by the people in District 1, Street 12. Every family came and planted something, so it's a collective effort.
    Reem Al-Hariri/UNICEF
  • Birds sing beautiful tunes. The birds make us feel a little bit like home.
    Jado Al-Obeid/UNICEF
  • My sisters have already started learning about make-up.
    Alaa Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • My sister draws a lot of these kinds of things, like guns and tanks – things she saw for real in Syria.
    Marwa Horani/UNICEF
  • My brothers and sister studying together using an educational board.
    Ibrahim Barghash/UNICEF
  • Students leave a learning support school at 11 a.m. in the morning.
    Mousa Al-Hrakeh/UNICEF
  • This is part of the water infrastructure planned for Za'atari, which I heard will pipe water straight to our home. They say it's bigger underground than it looks here.
    Marwa Horani/UNICEF
  • There was a hole in the ground where there was previously a washroom. The children took over and made a pretend shop. The children around the outside play the customers.
    Marwa Horani/UNICEF
  • Although my favorite game is basketball, there are so many children in the camp who love football that not everyone gets a chance to play on the field. I wish there were enough football fields so that all of them can enjoy the game.
    Khalil Al-Refaie/UNICEF
  • A lot of children come out to play football in the evening around 6:30 p.m., as it is much cooler.
    Alaa Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • I took the picture of the Jordanian flag as it reminded me of our own flag in Syria.
    Diana Rzeiq/UNICEF
  • As Syrian children, we loved playing with toys. When we came here, we were forced to leave all our toys and came here with nothing.
    Omaymah Hoshan/UNICEF
  • This is our neighbor's daughter. I helped raise her and love her like my own sister. She is crying because she wanted ice cream.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • My brother looked so sweet as he patted our little sister to sleep.
    Marah Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • My 9-year-old cousin helping our mother crochet a shawl.
    Mariam Al-Hariri/UNICEF
  • I was reading this book on journalism at a friend's place. I wanted to highlight the importance of education and that even if it's not your book, you can still read and learn.
    Modar AlHamadani/UNICEF
  • Religious books in our mosque. We have not lost our faith in God despite all our suffering.
    Ahmad Al-Koud/UNICEF
  • A boy about my age transports items on a wheelbarrow past the mosque.
    Ahmad Al-Koud/UNICEF
  • This is a children's playground in District 11. I feel good that children have a place to play. So beautiful.
    Mohammad Al-Akrad/UNICEF
  • One of our neighbors lost his leg in Syria.
    Lobna AlHariri/UNICEF
  • A donkey cart commonly used in the camp to transport things.
    Mohammad Al-Arabi/UNICEF
  • Our neighbors relax under the shade of the water tank.
    Marah Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • The water truck comes around 4 p.m. every day. A neighbor helps fill up the tank.
    Alaa Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • Just before we ate our breakfast at around noon, my sister wanted some water to drink and I took this photo.
    Qasem Mohd Rzaeq/UNICEF
  • My father, right, chats with a neighbor in our home at the camp.
    Mohammad Baraa/UNICEF
  • My brother's cigarettes and "mate" (yerba mate) tea. I took this picture to show the habits of Syrian people. Although coffee is very popular in Syria, this kind of tea is preferred in the country side of Damascus.
    Khalil Al-Refaie/UNICEF
  • Shai (tea) is a part of our lives. We drink it from the time we wake up, during all our meals and throughout the day. It is a fundamental part of our life.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • Reem Al-Hariri is pictured playing the keyboard at the Makani center. </br></br>I love music. I love acting too.
    Reem Al-Hariri/UNICEF
  • This is a hand-slapping game. I love to watch my sister and brother laughing and having fun.
    Suha Msallam/UNICEF
  • I love shoes.
    Shatha Barghash/UNICEF
  • A girl going to throw out garbage. I like this photo because it is important to throw garbage in the right place so the rest of the area stays clean.
    Marwa Horani/UNICEF
  • Beautiful dresses and gowns for sale at one of the shops in the camp market.
    Esra'a Al Basam/UNICEF
  • My friend and I stand in front of a clothing store and capture our reflection in the window.
    Khaldeya Ali/UNICEF
  • There must have been over a hundred birds flying overhead. I wish I could fly with them.
    Marah Al Khatib/UNICEF
  • Sandstorms are quite common in the camp, especially in the afternoon.
    Khaldeya Ali/UNICEF
  • There was so much garbage that it caught my eye. It is cleaned up now, but at that moment I wanted to take a photo to show the importance of environmental conservation.
    Bayan Masri/UNICEF
  • Children from our neighborhood go to a learning center.</br></br> Editor's Note: There are approximately 26 informal learning centers in Za'atari called "Makani" or "My Space" in Arabic, where children can play sports, learn life skills, do art and cultural activities or receive counseling and do school work. They often go there for the second half of the day, when they are not in school, and on Saturdays.
    Aya Barghash/UNICEF
  • At a Relief International learning support school, these two teachers love playing chess during their spare time – and they are very good at it.
    Mousa Al-Hrakeh/UNICEF
  • A neighbor enjoys the pleasant evening weather.
    Esra'a Al Basam/UNICEF
  • Football in Za'atari at sunset. I don't know what we would do if we didn't have football in our lives.
    Mohammad Al Hamid/UNICEF
  • Dusk in Za'atari.
    Mariam Al-Hariri/UNICEF
  • These kids, like thousands of others, go to school. There are enough places for children to get an education in Za'atari for whoever wants to get it.
    Ahmad Al-Koud/UNICEF
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