Carole Alfarah
  • In 2011, photojournalist Carole Alfarah turned her camera onto a subject close to her heart -- her own homeland, Syria. Documenting a civil war that was rapidly spreading underneath her own feet, she documented the sorrow and loss of her neighbors. Documenting Syria from 2011 to 2014, Alfarah observed, "All civilians could be victims of this bloody conflict, death does not discriminate in Syria." Pictured, a destroyed bedroom in a house caused by a suicide car explosion, March 17, 2012 in Damascus, Syria
    Carole Alfarah
  • "What happened? My memory is blurring...I feel that I have lost every beautiful moment I have ever lived in my home. When I close my eyes, I remember... I remember, people's faces filled with fatigue, oppression, and pride. What happened? My memory is blurring…The spring is over. The summer came hot and destructive." Pictured, a displaced woman in a rented room where she now lives with her husband and children, Dec. 10, 2013 in Jaramana, Syria.
    Carole Alfarah
  • "When I close my eyes, I remember... I remember, people's screams filled with fears. I remember parts of people's bodies thrown everywhere. What happened? My memory is blurring." Pictured, after an explosion, May 10, 2012 in Damascus, Syria.
    Carole Alfarah
  • "We have lost everything, we have become without names, without faces, without existence. We have transformed into numbers... numbers of dead, of missing, of widows, of orphans. We have become the numbers of displaced refugees... of unidentified. What happened? My memory is blurring... nothing is sacred anymore. Our bedrooms, our houses, our mosques and churches are all targets of destruction." Pictured, bullets from shots fired between the Syrian Rebels and the Syrian Army are seen on the ground, Sept. 27, 2013, in Damascus, Syria.
    Carole Alfarah
  • "What happened? In my home... the smell of death is everywhere. In my home, everyday, we wait for the morning that will bring us peace." -- Words by Carole Alfarah. Pictured, a girl washes a tea cup as her younger sister watches, Sept. 21, 2013 in Damascus, Syria. The two siblings are pictured inside a shared room used as a kitchen by displaced Syrian families.
    Carole Alfarah
  • The coffin of Maria Kahla, 19, is seen outside the Lady of Damascus Church, May 16, 2012, in Damascus, Syria. Maria, her father and her friends were killed when Maria's father was dropping them off to school when an explosion targeting the morning rush hour traffic went off.
    Carole Alfarah
  • Traces of bullets on the wall of a living room are seen inside a home, June 13, 2014, in Homs, Syria.
    Carole Alfarah
  • Khaled Hassan, pictured after he survived a suicide explosion, May 10, 2012, in Damascus, Syria. Hassan said: "I normally wake up at 7:50 am to go to work. On that day, there was an explosion at 8 am. The house shook.... I ran to the street with my brother... Suddenly, a second explosion took place... I was thrown in the air and landed on the floor, everything happened in seconds. I thought about my [pregnant] wife and children and rushed towards my house. The children were laying on the floor. I saw one of my neighbor's children with his body in one place and his hand in another."
    Carole Alfarah
  • A destroyed kitchen inside a home is pictured, June 14, 2014, in Homs, Syria.
    Carole Alfarah
  • On Dec. 23, 2012, Alfarah and her family left Syria for Spain. Her family did not want to leave but the strain of constantly living in fear and witnessing violence was taking a toll on her family especially on the health of her mother. Alfarah tells ABC News, "Being away from home was a hard and long process to accept... I couldn't accept the idea of not being in Syria... I felt so small and useless to see my people suffering from a distance." Pictured, blood on the bathroom sink of a victim who was wounded when an explosion went off in the town, March 17, 2012, in Damascus, Syria.
    Carole Alfarah
  • A little girl holds her Minnie Mouse doll and stands next to a small room where a woman sits with her baby, Sept. 25, 2013, in Damascus, Syria. The woman, pictured, lives in this small room with her husband and their newborn baby. The room was originally made as a small storage room to hide electricity boxes. In this house, 10 Syrian families live together, after being displaced from their homes due to the conflict.
    Carole Alfarah
  • Alfarah tells ABC News, "I am praying a lot for peace. I love Syria and Syrians. I am able to love and I am able to forgive. I have faith that the war will end and I am praying for an end soon." Alfarah and her family hope to return to Syria when the war has ended and want to help rebuild their country. Pictured, a view of Syria's third largest city, Homs, destroyed by the fighting between the Syrian armed rebels and the Syrian Army, June 16, 2014.
    Carole Alfarah
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