Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • Known for his postwar social documentary work, Werner Bischof was inspired to become a journalist after the ruin of World War II left him unable to be a passive observer. <a href="http://aperture.org/shop/werner-bischof-backstory" target="external">"Werner Bischof: Backstory"</a> is the first major monograph on the photographer to be been published in two decades. A train of the Red Cross, transporting children to Switzerland, in Budapest, Hungary, in 1947.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • Bischof travelled extensively to document both the suffering of the postwar world and the day-to-day life within traditional cultures affected by industry and technology. The last convention of the Social Democratic Party in Budapest, Hungary, in 1947.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • The book is organized geographically by the places that he visited: Europe, India, Japan and Korea, Hong Kong, Indochina, and North and South America. Unemployed men in Budapest, Hungary, in 1947.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • He received recognition for his coverage of World War II and in 1949 became one the first members of Magnum Photos, an international photographic cooperative agency. International Press photographers covering the Korean War in Kaeson, South Korea, in 1952.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • Marco Bischof, Werner Bischof's son, said that this photograph had never been published. New York in 1953.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • "Only with light, movement, and people do I hope to be able to contribute to the making of a happier world," wrote Bischof in a letter to Rosellina Mandel in 1948. Students at a country school during their recreation in the village of Naarva, Finland, in 1948.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • "I'm back in Freiburg for the first time in six years and I can no longer recognize this once-proud city...My first view of total destruction: a confusion of rusted iron, all the everyday objects, typewriters, safes, bedsteads, and in the center, a church utterly destroyed by fire," wrote Bischof. Three nuns walked in the town of Freiburg im Breisgau in the region of Baden-Württemberg, in 1945.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • "We have the opportunity to come into contact with influential artists and politicians, which extends our horizons far beyond the restricted impressions of tourists," wrote Rosellina Bischof, Werner Bischof's wife, in 1954. The artist Frida Kahlo in Mexico City, in 1954.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
  • Unemployed people look for jobs at the railroad station at the Seine-Maritime department in Rouen, France, in 1945.
    Copyright Werner Bischof/Magnum Photos
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