Zalmai
  • "Dread and Dreams" brings together images that Zalmaï, a photographer, made between 2008 and 2013 against the backdrop of the 14-year U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan that culminated in 2014 with the withdrawal of American troops. <a href="http://daylightbooks.org/products/dread-and-dreams"target="external">"Dread and Dreams"</a> was published by Daylight Books in 2015. Bamyan Province, Afghanistan, 2012.
    Zalmai
  • Afghan-born photographer Zalmaï was forced to flee to Switzerland at the age of 15 after the 1980 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Kabul, 2012.
    Zalmai
  • As a freelance photographer, Zalmaï has spent years capturing the human cost of war around the world and in his home country, Afghanistan, where he also sees signs of hope. Kabul, 2008.
    Zalmai
  • Empathetic, indignant and still hopeful, Zalmaï’s photographs draw attention to Afghanistan’s ongoing struggle, which has largely left the headlines, by focusing on the Afghan people and their lived experience of war, insecurity, chronic governmental mismanagement, corruption in a huge scale and international negligence. The Kajaki Dam, in Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008.
    Zalmai
  • Zalmaï’s photographs reveal the stark reality of life in Afghanistan for the millions of Afghan refugees who have returned to their country since 2002, only to find they cannot go back to their homes. Herat, Afghanistan, 2008.
    Zalmai
  • They are instead forced to live in squalid conditions in makeshift refugee camps and urban slums where most live on the brink of survival, and many take refuge in drugs. The Kajaki Dam, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008.
    Zalmai
  • Assignments took Zalmaï around the world, eventually leading him back to Afghanistan. Kabul, 2009.
    Zalmai
  • The book contributes to the dialogue about the legacy of a war that is still shrouded in uncertainty as Afghans lose faith in their government, and in the international community that appears to have forgotten them. Kabul, 2008.
    Zalmai
  • In his essay in the book, Zalmaï writes: “My work is not about war, but war is in my work. And this is the core of my photography: ordinary moments turn out to be extraordinary. As extraordinary as any battle. My hope is to pay attention, to expose meaning in moments that otherwise pass unnoticed, to put a color on the dream of a simple life, in peacetime. We have to look at both the destructive force and the life force. They always clash, but the life force wins eventually.” Kabul, 2008.
    Zalmai
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