Ryo Minemizu
  • Plankton is made up of a diverse collection of microscopic organisms that are unable to swim against the current in large bodies of water. These organisms include bacteria, algae, single-celled animals and even the eggs and larval stages of larger animals. Photographer <a href="http://www.ryo-minemizu.com/News"target="external">Ryo Minemizu</a> won a Nikkei National Geographic Photo Award for his photographs of plankton that he calls "Preciousness of Life." </br></br>Here, a very young diamond squid strikes a "threatening" pose by raising its arms.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • "The Secret World of Plankton" exhibit on view at Foto Care in New York City from June 21-24 will feature 24 photographs, including three large-scale works, which capture in meticulous detail the beauty and complexity of plankton. Apart from bacteria, these plants, animals and other types of organisms are the most abundant life form on Earth and play a critical role in the marine food chain. </br></br>Sea anemones are a group of water-dwelling, predatory animals that look like flowers, Feb. 2009, in Osezaki, Shizuoka, Japan.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • The larva of a Limidae, a bivalve creature similar to clams, oysters and scallops, lives behind rocks, May 2016, Okinawa Island, Okinawa, Japan. </br></br>Ryo Minemizu comments, "Plankton are intriguing and beautiful creatures. They symbolize how precious life is by their tiny existence."
    Ryo Minemizu
  • Mantis Shrimp larva has an unusual shell that resembles a balloon, October 2015, in Kume Island, Okinawa, Japan.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • Ryo adds, "I wanted other people to see them as they are in the sea so it was my motivation from the beginning to shoot plankton underwater, which is quite a challenge… their movements are hard to predict." </br></br>A long-arm larval octopus, July 2016, Kume Island, Okinawa, Japan.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • The larva of a peanut worm, January 2016, in Osezaki, Shizuoka, Japan. This is a type of marine benthos, which are organisms that live in either the sediment of the seafloor, sand or under stones.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • The final larval stage of certain mollusks have two ciliated flaps. These ciliated flaps are minute hair-like structures, called veligers, and are used for swimming and feeding.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • Aglaura hemistoma is a very small jellyfish and has an umbrella diameter that is less than two tenths of an inch.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • "Why are the shapes and colors of plankton as tiny as a few millimeters so awe-inspiring? It is because the life they embody is in its perfect status, drifting to the flow of the water in a natural environment," says Ryo. </br></br> Enneagonum hyalinum is a kind of organism that forms colonies developed from a single fertilized egg. They are a sexually mature form of the species capable of reproduction.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • According to the photographer, "This is most probably a larva of a type of floating octopus. It floats in the sea and has a transparent body in an orange-colored organ called the nucleus."
    Ryo Minemizu
  • In the sea where there is nothing to hide behind, being transparent provides protection. This is a juvenile fish of the Acanthuridae family. Its body is so thin and transparent you can see through its skeleton, September 2015, in Kume Island, Okinawa, Japan.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • This juvenile ribbonsfish was photographed at night near the Ogasawara Islands, Tokyo, Japan, April 2016. </br></br> "Organisms who cannot swim well try to be carried by the current as far as possible without using their own energy. This strategy is called 'Buoyancy adaptation.' Some develop part of their body so they are easily drifted by the water. Others move by making use of other creatures," observes the photographer.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • This larval crab species spends most of its life in the sand and has long spines that are very useful for self-defense.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • The distinguishing feature of Arnoglossus yamanakai larval fish is an elongated flag-like appendage, which is developed from the dorsal fin known as an vexillifer and can be used in self-defense.
    Ryo Minemizu
  • Grouper larval fish inhabit coral reefs. Their vexillifer that occurs during the floating period has a bulk greater than its body, a very effective buoyancy adaptation. </br></br> For more information and to RSVP for the opening reception on June 21 at 6:30pm, please visit, <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-secret-world-of-plankton-gallery-opening-tickets-34799302651?aff=andrea"target="external">"The Secret World of Plankton"</a> by Ryo Minemizu. Ryo will also teach a photo workshop at <a href="http://bit.ly/2s0oI8E"target="external">Foto Care</a> on June 22.
    Ryo Minemizu
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