Stephen Shames
  • Published on the 50th anniversary of the party’s founding, "Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers," by <a href="http://stephenshames.com/" target="external">Stephen Shames</a>, who is one of America's leading photographers dealing with social issues. Admired, reviled, emulated and misunderstood, the Black Panther Party was one of the most creative and influential responses to racism and economic inequality in American history. Here, Panthers line up at a "Free Huey" rally in DeFremery Park, in west Oakland's ghetto, July 28, 1968, in Oakland, California.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panther Chairman Bobby Seale campaigns for mayor of Oakland, California, on a city bus, 1973. Seale ran for mayor of Oakland, California in 1973 and received the second-most votes in a field of nine candidates but ultimately lost in a runoff with incumbent Mayor John Reading. The Black Panther Party's 1972 voter registration drive put several thousand new voters on the books. That registration drive helped Lionel Wilson became the first black mayor of Oakland in 1977.
    Stephen Shames
  • A boy gives a raised fist salute as he and a friend sit on a statue in front of the New Haven County Courthouse during a demonstration of 15,000 people during the Bobby Seale/Ericka Huggins trial, on May 1, 1970. Bobby Seale, chairman of the Black Panther Party was on trial along with Ericka Huggins for murder. Both were acquitted.
    Stephen Shames
  • Children at a "Free Huey, Free Bobby" rally in front of the Federal Building, in Feb. 1970, in San Francisco.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panther Minister of Defense and co-founder Huey Newton listens to Bob Dylan's record "Highway 61" in his house shortly after his release from prison, Aug. 1970, Berkeley, California.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panthers carry George Jackson's coffin into St. Augustine's Church for his funeral service as a huge crowd watches, Aug. 28, 1971, in Oakland, California. In 1961, George Jackson was convicted of armed robbery and sentenced to serve one year to life in prison. During his first years at San Quentin State Prison, he became involved in revolutionary activity, as well as assaults on guards and fellow inmates. Such behavior, in turn, was used to justify his continued incarceration. Jackson was killed on Aug. 21, 1971, while in the maximum security prison, one year after his brother died.
    Stephen Shames
  • The Lumpen, the Panthers’ singing group, performs at the boycott of Bill's Liquors. Clark Bailey, known as Santa Rita, is dancing, Michael Torrence (front) and James Mott (back) are drumming and Torrence, who went on to sing back up for Marvin Gaye, now runs an anger management and pregnancy program in South Central Los Angeles.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panther Gloria Abernethy selling papers at the Mayfair supermarket boycott, 1971, in Oakland, California.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panther children in a classroom at the Intercommunal Youth Institute, the Black Panther school, 1971, in Oakland, California. In 1970, in Oakland, David Hilliard created the idea for the first full-time liberation day school. This school, and its attendant dormitories in Oakland and Berkeley, was simply called the Children’s House. This school concept, directed by Majeda Smith and a team of Black Panther Party members, became the way in which sons and daughters of Black Panther Party members were educated.
    Stephen Shames
  • Two women with bags of food at the People's Free Food Program, one of the Panthers’ survival programs, 1972, in Palo Alto, California.
    Stephen Shames
  • Panther Jerry Dunigan, known as "Odinka," talks to kids while they eat breakfast on Chicago's south side, November 1970, in Chicago. The Free Breakfast for School Children Program was a community service program run by the Black Panther Party. Inspired by contemporary research about the essential role of breakfast for optimal schooling, the Panthers would cook and serve food to the poor inner city youth of the area.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panther Minister of Information Eldridge Cleave sits inside the Panther National headquarters after it was shot up in the middle of the night by two Oakland policemen following a not guilty verdict for Huey Newton in his first-degree murder trial, Sept. 29, 1968, in Oakland, California. On October 28, 1967, Oakland police officer John Frey was shot to death in an altercation with Huey P. Newton during a traffic stop, who also suffered gunshot wounds, along with backup officer Herbert Heanes. Newton was convicted of voluntary manslaughter at trial, but the conviction was overturned.
    Stephen Shames
  • Kathleen Cleaver, communications secretary and the first female member of the Party's decision-making Central Committee, talks with Black Panthers from Los Angeles who came to the "Free Huey" rally in DeFremery Park (named by the Panthers Bobby Hutton Park), in West Oakland, California, on July 28, 1968.
    Stephen Shames
  • Black Panther Chairman and co-founder Bobby Seale speaks at a "Free Huey" rally in Defermery Park, in West Oakland, California, on July 28, 1968. Also with Seale is Bill Brent (L), who later went to Cuba, and Wilford Holiday (R), known as Captain Crutch.
    Stephen Shames
  • Panthers stand just off stage at a "Free Huey" rally in DeFremery Park, 1968, in Oakland, California. Cle Brooks (arms folded) was a San Francisco Panther who went to San Quentin Prison and started the San Quentin chapter of the Black Panther Party. For more information on how to obtain this book, please go to <a href="http://bit.ly/28WWcuK" target="external">Abrams Books</a>.
    Stephen Shames
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