Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Los Angeles based photographer Jae. C. Hong spent several months photographing the lives of superhero impersonators on Hollywood Boulevard. <br><br> Rashad Rouse, 27, whose dream is getting his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, hangs upside down from a traffic signal pole in a Spider Man costume to get attention from tourists, May 25, 2017, on Hollywood Boulevard, in Los Angeles. Rouse is a musician and sometimes works as an Uber driver when he is not working on the boulevard.
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Wearing a Superman costume, Toly Shtapenko, of Ukraine, takes a long stride along the Hollywood Walk of Fame to impress tourists, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, March 2, 2017. While the Hollywood we see in movies is a place of glamour and beautiful celebrities, the cast of superheroes filling Hollywood Boulevard is frequently anything but. Many are people struggling to make a buck as they pursue their dream of stardom.
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Superhero impersonator Justin Harrison, left, rides a Metro train wearing a Superman costume on his way to Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles, May 16, 2017. "I always go out in a costume," said Harrison. "I love seeing people happy and seeing them smile."
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Ramiro Rodriguez in a Bumblebee costume, a character from the Transformers movie series, shakes hands with young tourists on Hollywood Boulevard, in Los Angeles, May 26, 2017. The 39-year-old former restaurant worker from Guadalajara, Mexico, changed his career after watching a film on Hollywood characters. Rodriguez and his brother invested all their savings in the costume. Even on bad days, Rodriguez said they still make enough to buy dinner.
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Donte, a musician who only gave his first name, straightens out dollar bills on his first day in a brand new Chewbacca costume purchased from eBay for $441, May 25, 2017, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Donte said he replaced the old one because he wasn't making any money with it.
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Wearing a $5,000 Iron Man costume, actor Paul Louis Harrell leaves his apartment building, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, June 4, 2017. "I'm successful because I have the best costume on the block and it's the most expensive one on the block," said Harrell. Longtime street performers like Harrell have concerns. They say business used to be more lucrative until the boulevard became overpopulated with costumed characters. What's worse, they say some look grungy, while others turn off tourists with aggressive demands for money.
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Wearing a Superman costume, Justin Harrison kisses his wife, Hope, May 16, 2017, in their apartment before heading out to Hollywood Boulevard in downtown Los Angeles. Harrison said they rely on help from the government to pay their rent because his income as a superhero impersonator isn't enough.
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Batman impersonator Matthias Balke is silhouetted while standing on Hollywood Boulevard near the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, March 2, 2017. Wearing his $3,000 Batman costume, Balke said he doesn't grab tourists or crack a joke to get their attention. Instead, he waits for them to come to him. "My way of soliciting is the quality of my costume," he said. "People see it, they come to me to ask me for a picture. I'd never walk up to anybody."
    Jae C. Hong/AP
  • Captain America impersonator Henry Hodge, a cinematographer from England who lives a stone's throw away from Hollywood's Dolby Theatre, opens his apartment door in Los Angeles, May 8, 2017. "The boulevard is the only thing that gives me the freedom to do what I really want to do," said Hodge. "I never have to miss a film meeting. I'm always available to shoot."
    Jae C. Hong/AP
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